I don’t believe in eLearnings*

This might come as a surprise to most, considering I design learning experiences for a living.

But I also spend a lot of time talking people out of eLearnings too.

While I think eLearning can be helpful in presenting initial content or reinforcing it, I do not think it’s where a lot of learning actually takes place.

For an eLearning to be useful, there has to be something else. There either has to be some sort of group discussion or coaching to reinforce the concepts, and an action item or activity for the learner. That’s when the true learning takes place, when you give someone an opportunity to apply concepts.

I also believe eLearning doesn’t work because of two other key components:

1.) People are sick of staring at their devices for learning. Yesterday people craved just in time training that could be done anywhere, anytime, and thus eLearning was born. But, today people are craving connection like never before.

2.) By nature, eLearning is on a device that makes it really easy to get distracted. Sitting right there with your eLearning is your email, your social media, your Slack, your work projects…etc. It’s hard to stay focused (and motivated) with so much going on around you.

Maybe someone somewhere can make me a believer of eLearnings, but for now, I’ll be a believer in blended learning.

Want to learn more about the connection-rich, blended learning experiences I create or can help you create? Reach out: www.adrianeejones.com

​ *I am defining eLearning here as self-paced/asynchronous “learning events” that take place via electronic media (and are sometimes created with tools like Articulate Storyline or Adobe Captivate).

Author: Adriane Jones

www.adrianeejones.com
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adrianejones/

Adriane is a Learning and Development Architect at her L&D Consultancy, Adriane E Jones. Adriane is fueled by her passion for reimagining the world of work. She considers herself a “work futurist,” eager to make the world of work better, because she believe that is key to making the world a better place. Adriane believes that work doesn’t just have to be for a paycheck, it can also be a place where we learn, grow, and sometimes even become better versions of ourselves. She helps organizations figure out how to help employees do that.
Adriane is also passionate about self-development, and when she’s not exploring the outdoors or spending time with her family, you can often find her reading a book, listening to a podcast, or leading a conversation at her passion project, Future Of Work Network.

1 Comment

  1. The biggest problem with e-learning is that it is defined, confined and aligned to exactly the definition the author has “asteriskated.” I say this because I just made up a word because I needed one. Has anyone ever bought a car? No. They’ve bought a Ford or a Honda or Toyota or a BMW. After more than 20 years of e-learning, why is an electronic page-turner still a thing? Where’s the creativity? Where’s the innovation? I’ll tell you; it’s hidden with the innovative, creative solution makers that dare to forget the box. Most learning consultants are “too tired” to educate or persuade execs to embrace next level learning approaches. “What’ll it cost?!” they cry, and the learning consultant says “Well, I could do a click-book for you for $500.” “SOLD” shouts the HR director. And here we are.

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